Aging Baby Boomers Likely to Face Inadequate Care for Mental Health, Substance Abuse says Institute of Medicine Report

UPDATE July 11, 2012
Aging Baby Boomers Likely to Face Inadequate Care for Mental Health, Substance Abuse says Institute of Medicine Report – From the IOM press release dated July 10, 2012

Millions of baby boomers will likely face difficulties getting diagnoses and treatment for mental health conditions and substance abuse problems unless there is a major effort to significantly boost the number of health professionals and other service providers able to supply this care as the population ages, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine.

The report conservatively estimated that between 5.6 million and 8 million older Americans — 14 percent to 20 percent of the nation’s overall elderly population — have one or more mental health conditions or problems stemming from substance misuse or abuse.  Depressive disorders and dementia-related behavioral and psychiatric symptoms are the most prevalent.  Rates of accidental and intentional misuse of prescription medications are increasing.  Although the rate of illicit drug use among older individuals is low, studies indicate that it will likely increase as the baby boomers age.

Most primary care providers will have frequent contact with older patients, yet their training includes little if any education on geriatric mental health and substance use, the report notes.  Few opportunities exist to specialize in geriatric care for these conditions, and financial incentives and mentorships are not in place to encourage health professionals to enter or stay in this field. —end—

Don’t be a statistic!
Diabetes, Dementia, and Depression, the connection between the three health challenges have been shown in recent medical literature to be very powerful. Listen:

“Diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for cognitive dysfunction and dementia.” (1)

“Depression in patients with diabetes was associated with a substantively increased risk for development of dementia compared with those with diabetes alone.” (2)

“evidence suggests an increased risk of developing dementia (including Alzheimer’s disease) in individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes but also in those with poor insulin sensitivity without diabetes, implicating a mechanistic link between adiposity (belly fat), insulin sensitivity and dementia.” (3)

In the November 24, 2010 issue of Time Magazine, an article discussed what physicians had long suspected – depression and diabetes were connected. Citing a study from the Harvard School of Public Health that appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine (1) which noted that “women who suffered from depression were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes during the study period than women who weren’t depressed; women with diabetes were 29% more likely to develop depression than women without diabetes.” A correlation existed. (4)

Further “the more severe the depression or diabetes was, the more likely that women would develop the other disease. Women whose diabetes was serious enough to require insulin, for instance, were 53% more likely to develop depression during the 10-year time frame, compared with women without diabetes. And women who took antidepressants to manage their depression were 25% more likely than undepressed women to develop diabetes.”

Research appearing in the Archives of General Psychiatry suggested that “Depression in patients with diabetes was associated with a substantively increased risk for development of dementia compared with those with diabetes alone.” (5)

The physical cause of depression in diabetes.

Links have been made to stress hormone overproduction as leading to diabetes. On one hand, the stress hormones may lead to obesity – read about symptoms of depression in obesity and may lead to under eating our poor nutrition. Both factors for diabetes.

You can also read about the estrogen-serotonin-depression connection and the connection between hormones and alzheimer’s disease and our treatment methods for Diabetes.

At the Magaziner Center for Wellness, we treat more than just the diabetes, or just the depression, or just the memory problems, we treat the whole you. Contact us

1. Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Jan;45(1):17-22. Epub 2012 Jan 27.
Bahrmann A, Bahrmann P, Kubiak T, et al. Diabetes and dementia. Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Jan;45(1):17-22. Epub 2012 Jan 27.

2. Katon W, Lyles CR, Parker MM, et al. Association of depression with increased risk of dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes: the diabetes and aging study. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;69(4):410-7. Epub 2011 Dec 5.

3. Insulin resistance in the brain: An old-age or new-age problem?
Williamson R, McNeilly A, Sutherland C. Insulin resistance in the brain: An old-age or new-age problem? Biochem Pharmacol. 2012 May 16. [Epub ahead of print]

4. Pan A, Lucas M, Sun Q, et al. Bidirectional Association Between Depression and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women. Arch Intern Med. 2010;170(21):1884-1891. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2010.356)

5. Katon W, Lyles CR, Parker MM, et al. Association of Depression With Increased Risk of Dementia in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes. The Diabetes and Aging Study. Arch Gen Psychiatry. Published online December 5, 2011. doi:10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.154