Update: Testosterone and prostate cancer | Is the debate over? - Magaziner Center for Wellness

Update: Testosterone and prostate cancer | Is the debate over?

Category: Cancer, Prostate Cancer

There is a significant and heated debate in the medical community over testosterone and its effects on prostate cancer risk. According to some researchers the debate is over.

In the past urologists warned that men taking testosterone replacement therapy were at higher risks for prostate cancer. In fact men suffering from prostate cancer are placed on hormone therapy that curtails the production of testosterone in their bodies.

A new study appearing in November 2016 lead by European researchers and John Hopkins Medical School suggested that:

  • Prostate cancer appears to be unrelated to high testosterone levels. Testosterone Replacement Therapy for symptomatic hypogonadism (Low-T) does not appear to increase PSA levels nor the risk of prostate cancer development.1

In October 2016, Urologists at Baylor College of Medicine found that:

  • “Despite the historical reluctance toward the use of testosterone therapy in men with a history of prostate cancer, modern evidence suggests that testosterone replacement is a safe and effective treatment option for hypogonadal men with non-high-risk prostate cancer.”2

Research presented in May 2016 led by investigators at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center says men with low levels of the male sex hormone testosterone should not fear that testosterone replacement therapy will increase their risk of prostate cancer.

In the study, researchers found that, as a group, men prescribed testosterone for longer than a year had no overall increase in risk of prostate cancer and, in fact, had their risk of aggressive disease reduced by 50 percent.

In February 2016 doctors writing in the medical journal Aging Male found that:

  • “testosterone replacement therapy did not affect serum PSA level, prostate volume and maximal urinary flow rate. This study also suggests that testosterone replacement therapy does not cause the risk for prostate cancer development”3

In January 2016 an international team of researchers publishing in the British Medical Journal concluded:

  • Prostate cancer appears to be unrelated to endogenous testosterone levels. Testosterone replacement therapy for symptomatic hypogonadism does not appear to increase PSA levels nor the risk of prostate cancer development.4

Doctors presenting their research at the American Urological Association 2015 Annual Meeting said Testosterone, whether occurring naturally or taken as replacement therapy, does not cause prostate cancer or spur increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men.

Not only NOT cause prostate cancer, but research from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, investigators say that testosterone may assist in cases of prostate cancer.

In a surprising paradox, the male hormone testosterone, generally thought to be a feeder of prostate cancer, has been found to suppress some advanced prostate cancers and also may reverse resistance to testosterone-blocking drugs used to treat prostate cancer.

Would you like more information and research on treating declining testosterone levels? Please see this article on our site: Testosterone therapy – the research


Do you have questions about testosterone and prostate health?


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1: Boyle P, Koechlin A, Bota M, d’Onofrio A, Zaridze DG, Perrin P, Fitzpatrick J, Burnett AL, Boniol M. Endogenous and exogenous testosterone and the risk of prostate cancer and increased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level: a meta-analysis. BJU Int. 2016 Nov;118(5):731-741. Pubmed

2. Efesoy O, Apa D, Tek M, Çayan S. The effect of testosterone treatment on prostate histology and apoptosis in men with late-onset hypogonadism. Aging Male. 2016 Feb 29:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]

3. Boyle P, Koechlin A, Bota M, d’Onofrio A, Zaridze DG, Perrin P, Fitzpatrick J, Burnett AL, Boniol M. Endogenous and exogenous testosterone and the risk of prostate cancer and increased prostate specific antigen (PSA): a meta-analysis.BJU Int. 2016 Jan 18. doi: 10.1111/bju.13417. [Epub ahead of print]