Sciatica treatments - Magaziner Center for Wellness

Sciatica treatments

Here is a sciatica patient medical history example:

  • Back pain treatment – prescribed pain medications, muscle relaxants, and antidepressants

Analgesic and adjuvant pain drugs are often prescribed for patients with sciatica. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of sciatica are about five times more likely to take drugs than those with low back pain only. 1

But there is medical research that says this is not usually effective: “There is at best only low quality evidence to judge the efficacy and tolerability of drugs commonly prescribed for the management of sciatica in primary care. The available evidence does not clearly show favorable effects of NSAIDs, corticosteroids, antidepressants, or opioid analgesics in the immediate term, even compared with placebo.” 2

Opioids and NSAIDs are effective for chronic low back pain, “based on the significant rate of side effects with opioids and the lack of convincing superiority over NSAIDs, opioids are not recommended as a treatment for chronic low back pain.” Also, “antidepressants have no meaningful clinical benefit.” 1

  • Pain not responsive to treatment – prescribed steroid injections into the space around the spinal nerve to aleviate the irritation caused by a suspected herniated, or ruptured, disc.

But there is medical research that says this is not usually effective: “Although the benefits for epidural steroid injections may include transient pain relief for those with/without surgical disease, the multitude of risks attributed to these injections outweighs the benefits.” 3

Saline just as good? A recent randomized trial involving 84 adults with lumbosacral radiculopathy of less than 6 months’ duration compared 2 epidural injections, separated by 2 weeks, of steroids, etanercept, or saline, mixed with bupivacaine. Leg pain, measured 1 month after the second injection, was reduced more with steroids than with etanercept or saline, but the differences were not significant. Differences in back pain and function associated with steroids versus saline also were also not significant.4

Prolotherapy sciatica treatment

A few years back, in 2005, Harold Wilkenson, M.D., a neurosurgeon, published his research in the medical journal Pain Physician about the effectiveness in helping patients avoid a second spinal surgery. What he found was that in 35 patients who had prior lumbar surgery, and were recommended for a second surgery, only 4 of the 35 went on to the secondary surgery after they had received Prolotherapy treatment. 5

Here at the Magaziner Center for Wellness, our plan is to seek pain out at its source: the damaged tissue, joints, muscles, nerves, ligaments or tendons. We avoid pain medication usage and we help patients avoid surgery. Even patients who have tried chiropractic, epidural steroids, nerve blocks and even surgery with less than hoped for results, can be cured by Prolotherapy, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) treatments, and stem cell therapy.

Do you have a question about your sciatica? Email us magazinercenter@gmail.com

1. White AP, Arnold PM, Norvell DC, Ecker E, Fehlings MG. Pharmacologic management of chronic low back pain: synthesis of the evidence. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2011 Oct 1;36(21 Suppl):S131-43

2. Pinto RZ, Maher CG, Ferreira ML, et al. Drugs for relief of pain in patients with sciatica: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 2012; 344 doi: 10.1136/bmj.e497 (Published 13 February 2012)

3. Epstein NE The risks of epidural and transforaminal steroid injections in the Spine: Commentary and a comprehensive review of the literature Spine: 2013;3:74-93

4. Cohen SP, et al. Epidural Steroids, Etanercept, or Saline in Subacute Sciatica. Annals of Internat Medicine vol. 156 no. 8 551-559

5. Wilkinson HA Injection therapy for enthesopathies causing axial spine pain and the “failed back syndrome”: a single blinded, randomized and cross-over study.: Pain Physician, Apr 2005, 8(2) p167-73