Is An Enlarged Heart A Problem Of Toxic Metal Exposure? - Magaziner

Is An Enlarged Heart A Problem Of Toxic Metal Exposure?


Over the last few years, the Magazine Center for Wellness has participated in research surrounding the use of EDTA chelation for patients with cardiovascular problems. These problems include past heart attacks and advanced coronary disease which may make the patient physically ineligible for cardiovascular surgery. EDTA Chelation therapy also provides an option for patients who choose not to undergo cardiac surgical procedures.

Chelation involves the intravenous infusion of vitamins, magnesium and a chelating agent, ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA.)

This mixture serves to chelate, or bind, toxic heavy metals, calcium and free radicals in blood vessel walls, which are then excreted in the urine. As a result, blood vessels become more pliable and circulation improves, which leads to the reduction or elimination of chest pain and other symptoms of vascular disease. Patients who have completed a course of chelation therapy often notice an improvement in energy and well-being, and are often able to reduce or eliminate their need for medication.

We have offered this treatment for more than 30 years. In 2012 the Magaziner Center for Wellness was chosen to participate in a study through the National Institutes of Health to test the effectiveness of EDTA chelation in patients suffering from heart disease. The study was called TACT, The Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy.(1)

In this article we will examine a portion of the findings of this study, the role of toxic metals on heart disease.

Toxic metal cardiology

There is a new awareness of the role of toxic metals in the management of heart disease. We call this “toxic metal cardiology.” If you need proof, look at the recent amount of research.

November 2018 – Olajide Buhari, MD, internal medicine resident at Jacobi Medical Center in New York and his colleagues released findings at the 2018 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions (2) that adults with high levels of lead and other heavy metals in their blood had greater odds of having high LDL or total cholesterol. The research team also found that those with higher mercury exposure had higher odds of elevated total cholesterol.

August 29, 2018 – Doctors at the Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge published research in the British Medical Journal (3) that found: “Exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, and copper is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. Mercury is not associated with cardiovascular risk. These findings reinforce the importance of environmental toxic metals in cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioral risk factors.”

Is an enlarged heart the problem of toxic metals?

September 2018 – In the medical journal Clinic Toxicology (4), Philippe Hantson, MD, Ph.D., published his findings on toxic metals and their possible impact on Dilated cardiomyopathy (an enlarged heart). Dr. Hantson suggests that enlarged heart is a frequent disease responsible for 40-50% of cases of heart failure. Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (heart disease that does not have a definitive cause, no history of high cholesterol, hypertension or other risk factors) maybe caused by various factors related to toxic causes including metals. He suggested:

  • Cobalt-related cardiomyopathy probably results from interference with energy production and contractile (the ability of the heart to contract) mechanisms, but additional factors (nutrition, hypothyroidism) are often required.
  • Antimony a metal frequently used as an alloy in tin and lead may cause lethal oxidative stress and cell death mediated by elevation in intra-cellular calcium.
  • Proposed mechanisms for mercury toxicity include glutathione depletion. Glutathione depletion has been linked to heart failure progression. Production of reactive oxygen species and its impact on mutation and toxic damage to DNA,  and interruption in selenium-dependent endogenous enzymatic reactions, (a valuable anti-oxidant resource).

Dr. Hantson concluded that the mechanisms behind toxic cardiomyopathy are complex and multifactorial but include interference with myocardial cell bioenergetics and intracellular calcium handling, the generation of ROS (see below), neurohormonal stress (Ventricular failure that result in vasoconstriction,) and induction of apoptosis (heart cell death).

The TACT findings on heavy metals.

In August 2018, TACT researchers lead by Gervasio A. Lamas, MD of Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, (5) found that while essential metals are crucial in maintaining cellular homeostasis (the balance that allows cells to function normally), excessive exposure may lead to metal-induced toxicity by increasing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

ROS is a complicated actor in our immune system that science has spent generations trying to understand. ROS is a mild mannered chemical compound that goes about its business sending chemical signals that helps cells maintain its homeostasis. However, ROS is also our immune system’s hired assassin, it is a killer of cells that ROS finds threatening to the normal balance of cellular life. When toxic metals are present, ROS can “overdeploy,”and overwhelm and deplete the cell’s intrinsic antioxidant defenses leading to oxidative stress. This leads to an inflammatory response implicated in cardiovascular disease.

The TACT study, in part, isolated on Iron and copper, the two best-known metals that have the potential of generating ROS and noted that EDTA chelation can be effective in chelating excessive amounts of these metals out of the body.

Other metals, the TACT study noted, referred to as xenobiotic (foreign) or toxic metals, have no role in human physiology (we don’t need them in us) and, like lead, may be toxic even in dilute concentrations. Some of the most commonly found toxic metals in humans include lead, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury, all of which cause – or at the very least are associated with – cardiovascular disease.

At the Magaziner Center for Wellness we utilize an extremely thorough and unique set of blood and urine tests, for patients suspected of heavy metal problems.  Taking into account all contributing factors, lifestyle, nutritional status, environmental factors, detoxification pathways and more, we develop a unique treatment plan for each patient, using safe and non-invasive methods such as chelation therapy and nutritional supplementation.

If you would like to explore more information, please contact our office so we can start a conversation with you.

1 Lamas GA, Goertz C, Boineau R, et al. Design of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT). Am Heart J. 2012;163(1):7-12.
2 Buhari O, et al. Poster Mo1196. Presented at: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Nov. 10-12, 2018; Chicago.
3 Chowdhury R, Ramond A, O’Keeffe LM, Shahzad S, Kunutsor SK, Muka T, Gregson J, Willeit P, Warnakula S, Khan H, Chowdhury S. Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis. bmj. 2018 Aug 29;362:k3310.
4 Hantson P. Mechanisms of toxic cardiomyopathy. Clinical Toxicology. 2018 Sep 23:1-9.
5 Diaz D, Fonseca V, Aude YW, Lamas GA. Chelation therapy to prevent diabetes-associated cardiovascular events. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2018;25(4):258-266.

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